World of Pageantry

World of Pageantry

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Homogenization of Routines
PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:38 pm 
Offline
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: Fri Nov 28, 2008 8:55 am
Posts: 357
While I give prop spins (get it?) to DMs of today for being able to execute their routines well, I think all these routines have become so predictable I find myself able to guess them move by move by the end of the day. What happened to the creativity? Drum majors back in my day may not have been clean, but at least there was variety. Today, everyone does the same old moves, which would be ok if they weren't in the same order. Get creative! There's more ways to go to pike on a mace than a reverse flourish or a half forward round house on military baton. Props to Arcadia's DM this past weekend at Mt. Carmel for being different with his reverse roundhouse pike, but even then... his routine looks strikingly familiar to the previous Arcadia DMs. Get creative DMs, and take what you learned from your teachers and create your own style!

_________________
JC Chang
Parade Band Foundation, Inc.
http://www.paradeband.org
http://www.facebook.com/paradeband

World Drum Major Association, Inc.
http://www.worlddrummajor.org
http://www.facebook.com/worlddrummajor


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Homogenization of Routines
PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:04 pm 
Offline
Support Staff
Support Staff
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 3:51 am
Posts: 554
Location: Tustin
bandfan88 wrote:
While I give prop spins (get it?) to DMs of today for being able to execute their routines well, I think all these routines have become so predictable I find myself able to guess them move by move by the end of the day. What happened to the creativity? Drum majors back in my day may not have been clean, but at least there was variety. Today, everyone does the same old moves, which would be ok if they weren't in the same order. Get creative! There's more ways to go to pike on a mace than a reverse flourish or a half forward round house on military baton. Props to Arcadia's DM this past weekend at Mt. Carmel for being different with his reverse roundhouse pike, but even then... his routine looks strikingly familiar to the previous Arcadia DMs. Get creative DMs, and take what you learned from your teachers and create your own style!


From an instructor's and an adjudicator's standpoint, don't be shocked, I'd rather take a cleanly executed routine any day over another that has more variety yet executed poorly. That's what I grill into all my students because it's not just the DM score that I want them to be aware of, but also the one that matters most to band directors, and that's the DM caption on the Showmanship sheet for the band.

As for pikes, oh yeah, that's an easy remedy. But as for the general routine construction, I feel that some moves need to remain on the L circuits as they tend to show off more body movement than other moves, regardless of how trained that move may be with the drum major.

:shades:


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Homogenization of Routines
PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:27 pm 
Offline
New Recruit
New Recruit

Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:18 pm
Posts: 22
I certainly agree with the notion of placing variety in the routine. It's what the Judges also look for. But I also know that if you can't execute it correctly, it's kind of not worth having. I would suggest to Drum Majors that if you want to place a variety of routines, work them! Don't fall into the trap of doing something new a WEEK before your L-Pattern or Review. Always plan ahead, really I started to work on my L-Pattern/Parade season starting in August. This gives me immense time to add variety and execute it with perfection :)

_________________
Umayr Sufi
Granada H.S Asst. Drum Major 2008-2010
Drum Major Instructor
http://www.umayrsufi.com


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Homogenization of Routines
PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:38 pm 
Offline
New Recruit
New Recruit

Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:30 pm
Posts: 39
Location: IE/LA
I must say I agree with points from all three posts. Variety is the spice of life, and it tends to be the spice of a routine as well. Without variety, a routine can be incredibly bland, no matter how well-executed.

HOWEVER, no matter how many different spins, transitions, and specialty moves you toss in there, it will most likely look sloppy if not well-executed. I've always been a stickler to be at least near-perfect with each and every move, and always want every move to make sense in respect to the entire routine (relation to content, style, and type of routine), the specific command it's being executed in (serves a purpose in relation to all of the other individual moves), even down to that very segment of the command (flows well from the preceding move, and into the following move). Having said all of that snobby-sounding jargon, you can see that I'm dead-serious about execution.

I must agree that DMs should create, practice, and perfect their routines far earlier than their first performance...definitely not a week before. During our practice (Montebello, c/o '97), we would sprint/run, pick up our batons and do our routines while talking about something else completely or had someone ask us random questions. We wanted to make sure both our brains and bodies knew our routines inside out, and could perform them under pressure. Execution mattered that much to us.

...Please bare with me...

After saying all of that mumbo jumbo about how important execution is (and it really is), variety still remains the spice of life and routines. I must agree that there are plenty of cloned routines out there today, as there were yesterday, five years ago, ten years ago, and so forth. The problem could be solved for many with correct practice habits, good direction, and dedication.

In regards to style, I believe it's totally fine and respectful to utilize one learned from others, but DMs should definitely take ownership and expand from it.

Since the first post is imploring current DMs, I'll follow suit and toss in my two cents (or more) of advice:

- Know your basics inside out! Just like your band director, other teachers, and everyone else has probably said, you cannot build something awesome without a very sturdy foundation.

- Don't be lazy! Get the basics down so you can learn more intricate moves that are probably based on those exact basics (hence the term "basic"). Just like with any other activity, you can't be pushed anymore than you'll allow yourself to be pushed.

- Add variety to your routine! Practice it early enough to have it down cold before performance. Even if you use only your basics, there are soooooooo many ways to tweek them.

- Put thought into your routine, not just random moves! Like I said earlier, routines should make sense. Think it through, and your hard work will be evident. It's so awkward seeing a move that just doesn't fit...it almost makes me ignore the rest of a well-executed command.

Sorry to all if I sound like a tyrant/whiner here. I guess this thread just opened up some frustrations I feel watching recent Youtube vids. The most important thing is to have fun, learn, and all that positive stuff. :P

_________________
Band geek por vida


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Homogenization of Routines
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 6:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 6:31 pm
Posts: 3
mikekimchi wrote:

I must agree that DMs should create, practice, and perfect their routines far earlier than their first performance...definitely not a week before. During our practice (Montebello, c/o '97), we would sprint/run, pick up our batons and do our routines while talking about something else completely or had someone ask us random questions. We wanted to make sure both our brains and bodies knew our routines inside out, and could perform them under pressure. Execution mattered that much to us.

Since the first post is imploring current DMs, I'll follow suit and toss in my two cents (or more) of advice:

- Know your basics inside out! Just like your band director, other teachers, and everyone else has probably said, you cannot build something awesome without a very sturdy foundation.

- Don't be lazy! Get the basics down so you can learn more intricate moves that are probably based on those exact basics (hence the term "basic"). Just like with any other activity, you can't be pushed anymore than you'll allow yourself to be pushed.

- Add variety to your routine! Practice it early enough to have it down cold before performance. Even if you use only your basics, there are soooooooo many ways to tweek them.


I totally agree with you. So many drum majors are so fixed on learning tricks and specialty moves that they don't bother to perfect their basics. And the foundation of tricks are basics, so when the kids don't have their basics down you can see it in their performance because the tricks are sloppy. I would prefer to see a clean drum major with full basics than a drum major trying to do too much and the performance coming out sloppy.
And my how tradition continues... i can't count the times at Montebello when we worked out and then executed our routines for each other while talking about totally off things =) good times.

_________________
Brittany Martinez
Mighty Oiler Band "MOB"
Drum Major 2008-2009


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
  http://www.worldofpageantry.com Copyright © 1996 - 2006 Email:  admin@worldofpageantry.com  

Site design and maintenance by Dave Schaafsma at Dave's Web Dynamics